What is a Chain Sling?

Designed for overhead lifting, unmatched durability, and excellent performance, alloy chains slings and assemblies are a top choice when it comes to demanding lifting conditions. Chain slings are built tough to withstand a variety of working conditions, temperature resistant, and strong. Chain slings are available in multiple types, including single, double, triple, and quadruple legs.

alloy-chain-slings

Types of Welded and Mechanically Coupled Chain Slings and Assemblies

All chain slings must be configured to function safely and correctly to increase efficiency and maintain safety. Some of the types of chain slings we offer include:

Single Leg: A single leg chain sling has one chain length to support a lifted load.

Single Chain Sling Configurations

Components include one master link, alloy chain and end hook. Single Chain end links can vary. See chart below for types and variations.

Single Chain Type First End Link Second End Link
SOS Oblong Link Sling Hook
SOG Oblong Link Grab Hook
SGS Grab Hook Sling Hook
SGG Grab Hook Grab Hook
SSS Sling Hook Sling Hook
SOF Oblong Link Foundry Hook
SOO Oblong Link Oblong Link

Common Single Chain Slings Application

These types of chain slings are used for general overhead lifting and straight pull and vertical hitches. They are often used by mills, machine shops, foundries and general workshops.

 

Double Leg: Double leg chain slings have two lengths of chain to support a lifted load.

Double Chain Sling Configurations

Components include one master link, two separate alloy chain legs with two separate end hook. Double Chain end links can vary. See chart below for types and variations.

Double Chain Type First End Link Second End Link
DOS Oblong Link Sling Hooks
DOG Oblong Link Grab Hooks
DOF Oblong Link Foundry Hooks

 

Common Double Chain Slings Application

These types of chain slings are used for more involved overhead lifting where two points are necessary for lifting. They are often used by mills, machine shows and general workshops.

 

Triple Leg: A chain sling with three chain lengths to support a lifted load.

Triple Chain Slings Configurations

Components include one master link, three separate alloy chain legs with three separate end hook. Triple Chain end links can vary. See chart below for types and variations.

Triple Chain Type First End Link Second End Link
TOS Oblong Link Sling Hooks
TOG Oblong Link Grab Hooks
TOF Oblong Link Foundry Hooks

 

Common Triple Chain Slings Application

These types of chain slings are used for more involved overhead lifting where three points are necessary for lifting. They are often used by mills, machine shows and general workshops.

 

Quadruple Leg: A chain sling with four chain lengths to support a lifted load.

Quadruple Chain Sling Configurations

Components include one master link, four separate alloy chain legs with four separate end hook. Quadruple Chain end links can vary. See chart below for types and variations.

Quadruple Chain Type First End Link Second End Link
QOS Oblong Link Sling Hooks
QOG Oblong Link Grab Hooks
QOF Oblong Link Foundry Hooks

 

Common Quadruple Chain Slings Application

These types of chain slings are used for more involved overhead lifting where four points are necessary for lifting. They are often used by mills, machine shows and general workshops.

Chain Sling Material

It is essential to select a chain made from a strong material that will maintain its integrity with repeated use. Alloy steel chains, grade 80, 100, or 120 are the only chains acceptable for overhead lifting. While overloaded, alloy steel will stretch, whereas other types of steel will break. Alloy steel chains are specially made for repeated lifting. Other chains purchased from retail stores are not suitable for industrial or commercial use.

What to Know Before Purchasing a Chain Sling

Before purchasing a chain sling, gather the following information:

  • How heavy is the object that will be lifted?
  • What is the object’s center of gravity?
  • How many attachment points will be required for a balanced lift?
  • What are the sling angles?
  • What is the required reach of the chain sling?
  • Are there any clearance requirements?
  • What are the upper and lower fitting requirements?
  • What are the ambient conditions of the work environment?

Knowing the answers to the questions above will help you select or our expert recommend the right chain sling for lifting your specific load.

Chain Sling Grades

Chain slings each have an identification grade to specify their use:

Grade 30: Not suitable for overhead lifting. Approved for industrial and agricultural applications such as guard rain chain, logging, and securing loads.

Grade 40: Approximately 50% stronger than Grade 30, Grade 40 is suitable for load binding, tie-downs, and towing.

Grade 60: The sole purpose of a 60 chain is to transfer mechanical energy. They are used in conveyor systems in bottling and packaging, live-roller conveyors, agricultural equipment, conveying applications, drive applications.

Grade 70: Suitable for transport, logging, towing, and load binding. Grade 70 is 60% stronger than Grade 30 and the links have been heat treated.

Grade 80: Suitable for overhead lifting, slings, magnets, dragging, and pulling.

Grade 100: 25% stronger than grade 80 chain. Suitable for overhead lifting, slings, and tie-down applications.

Grade 120: 20% stronger than grade 100 chain. Suitable for overhead lifting, slings, and tie-down applications.

Chain Sling Safety Considerations

A few chain sling safety practices should be followed to avoid damage or injury. Please pay special attention to the manufacturer’s guidelines before and during chain sling use.

  • Inspect the chain sling daily for wear or stress.
  • Check the chain sling’s ID number, color code, and SWL
  • Chain slings are inspected and documented regularly, at least every 12 months.
  • The chain sling should be proof-tested by the manufacturer.
  • Consult the chain sling manufacturer if you will use the chain sling in conditions below 20◦F.
  • Chain slings should not be shortened, knotted, twisted, kinked or lengthened.
  • Chain slings should be hitched in a way that provides control of the load.
  • To prevent damage to the chain sling, material should be used to protect the sling from contact with corners, sharp edges or protrusions.
  • Follow the sling manufacturer’s guidelines to shorten or adjust the chain sling.
  • Avoid shock loading.
  • Operators should watch for any snagging.
  • Do not drag the chain sling along a floor or rough surface.
  • Do not constrict, bunch, or pinch the chain sling.
  • Avoid point loading on the hook unless the hook is made explicitly for point loading.
  • Do not pull the chain sling from beneath the load while the load is resting in the chain sling.

Daily Inspection of Chain Slings

Once your chain sling is in use, it is important to inspect it daily. The chain sling should not be used if:

  • Cracks are visible along the chain sling or its parts.
  • Visibly distorted, bent, twisted, or stretched chain links.
  • Corrosion
  • Visible heat damage
  • Any binding which has caused the chain links to be restricted.
  • Any other condition that interferes with the usability of the chain sling.

 

When Should My Chain Sling Be Removed from Service?

An alloy steel chain sling shall be removed from service if conditions such as the following are present:

  • Missing or illegible sling identification
  • Cracks or breaks
  • Excessive wear, nicks, or gouges. Minimum thickness on chain links shall not be below the values listed in the table on the next page
  • Stretched chain links or damage
  • Bent, twisted, or deformed chain links or components
  • Evidence of heat damage
  • Excessive pitting or corrosion
  • Lack of ability of chain or components to hinge freely
  • Weld splatter
  • Hook damage
  • Rigging hardware damage
  • Other conditions, including visual damage, that cause doubt as to the continued use of the sling.

 

If you need training on removal criteria for slings - please contact our team! We provide in-person or virtual sling inspection training.

 

 

Contact Us Today for a Chain Sling Quote

Ready to purchase chain slings for your business? Contact us today for a personalized quote.